fortress of attitude
fumettidccomics:

scottpatrick:

SUPERMAN

,

fuckyeahsploitation:

Giorgio Comolo via KIRBY-VISION @ the Jack Kirby Museum.

dudesmacdougal:


SUPER MONSTER 
8 OR 9 FT. TALL
PART BATMAN
SUPERMAN AND
WONDER WOMAN

- Jack Kirby

dudesmacdougal:

SUPER MONSTER

8 OR 9 FT. TALL

PART BATMAN

SUPERMAN AND

WONDER WOMAN

- Jack Kirby

zegas:

Tight Frank Miller pencils + faithful Klaus Janson inks = early stages of a great duo. They went on to create really stunning visuals shortly thereafter, but this stuff is still interesting.
themarvelageofcomics:

Here’s a comparison between Frank Miller’s pencils and Klaus Janson’s inks on a page of DAREDEVIL #172.

Miller

zegas:

Tight Frank Miller pencils + faithful Klaus Janson inks = early stages of a great duo. They went on to create really stunning visuals shortly thereafter, but this stuff is still interesting.

themarvelageofcomics:

Here’s a comparison between Frank Miller’s pencils and Klaus Janson’s inks on a page of DAREDEVIL #172.

Miller


According to Tor Kinlok (2005), “The K-Metal from Krypton evolved the relationship between Superman and Lois Lane. Having completed his soul-searching and faced with impending disaster, Superman sacrifices his secret identity to Lois in order to facilitate her rescue. Not a hoax, not a dream—and not an imaginary story. For real. But rather than the reaction that one might expect, Lois isn’t necessarily pleased at having been played the fool. The implication, however, is that she would eventually get over her annoyance, and the story concludes with the two characters working together as a team to fight crime and corruption for the benefit of humanity, forever altering the dynamic of their relationship.
Alex Ross points out in Alter Ego #30:
Only two years into the development of the character, this story would have ended the love triangle that has been considered fundamental to the Superman legend for 60 years.
This would have been a turning point in super-hero reality. It’s not only the simple idea that Superman shared his identity with Lois. It’s that Jerry Siegel was taking steps to evolve the archetypal super-hero story beyond the repetitive dramas created by this personal obstacle, which kept the characters’ relationship from maturing.
Instead, the mythology for Superman would have been much like the comic strips of the day in which the characters’ lives developed in a way that mirrored real life—they had character growth, relationships evolved and changed, they grew older, etc. The prime example is Gasoline Alley. In that way, you write a story that moves things forward. It’s obvious why the choice was made not to print this story back then, but the powers-that-were at DC were setting a precedent to be followed in all super-hero stories thereafter for decades to come. Who knows how well the history of comics would have fared with super-heroes whose lives changed as ours do? Watching our protagonist develop in this way might have engaged the audience on a more believable human level.
As Gerard Jones makes clear in Men of Tomorrow—that moment when DC pulled this story from publication was the same moment that the guiding control of Superman’s destiny was forever removed from his creators.”

According to Tor Kinlok (2005), “The K-Metal from Krypton evolved the relationship between Superman and Lois Lane. Having completed his soul-searching and faced with impending disaster, Superman sacrifices his secret identity to Lois in order to facilitate her rescue. Not a hoax, not a dream—and not an imaginary story. For real. But rather than the reaction that one might expect, Lois isn’t necessarily pleased at having been played the fool. The implication, however, is that she would eventually get over her annoyance, and the story concludes with the two characters working together as a team to fight crime and corruption for the benefit of humanity, forever altering the dynamic of their relationship.

Alex Ross points out in Alter Ego #30:

Only two years into the development of the character, this story would have ended the love triangle that has been considered fundamental to the Superman legend for 60 years.

This would have been a turning point in super-hero reality. It’s not only the simple idea that Superman shared his identity with Lois. It’s that Jerry Siegel was taking steps to evolve the archetypal super-hero story beyond the repetitive dramas created by this personal obstacle, which kept the characters’ relationship from maturing.

Instead, the mythology for Superman would have been much like the comic strips of the day in which the characters’ lives developed in a way that mirrored real life—they had character growth, relationships evolved and changed, they grew older, etc. The prime example is Gasoline Alley. In that way, you write a story that moves things forward. It’s obvious why the choice was made not to print this story back then, but the powers-that-were at DC were setting a precedent to be followed in all super-hero stories thereafter for decades to come. Who knows how well the history of comics would have fared with super-heroes whose lives changed as ours do? Watching our protagonist develop in this way might have engaged the audience on a more believable human level.

As Gerard Jones makes clear in Men of Tomorrow—that moment when DC pulled this story from publication was the same moment that the guiding control of Superman’s destiny was forever removed from his creators.”

Rick Veitch’s Mother Box

robot6:

This Mother Box illustration by Rick Veitch has an awesome story behind it:

Here’s a recent commission for a tattoo. The client had a rock and roll logo on his bicep that he wanted changed to something Kirbyesque. Considering the location, it just had to be a Mother Box.

Beautiful King Kirby pin-up of the Challengers of the Unkown

Beautiful King Kirby pin-up of the Challengers of the Unkown

comicsforever:

Jack Kirby: The DC Legacy // artwork by Jack Kirby (1971 and Beyond)

All these milestones include to work of the great late Jack Kirby, his legacy for DC Comics! While not as high profile as his work on Marvel Comics, Jack left his mark on DC with a rich cast of characters that are still around to this day. From top to bottom: The New Gods, which chronicled the adventures of Orion, Darkseid and another DC mainstays in a set up called “The Fourth World”; Mister Miracle, a.k.a Scott Lang, Big Barda’s husband; The Forever People a spin-off of the New Gods universe created by him; Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen, the launch tittle in which he introduced all his concepts and characters for DC; Kamandy, The Last Boy On Earth; The Demon, later renamed Ethrigan and featured in the animated DC Universe; OMAC a character inspired in Captain America; his last collaboration with his pal Joe Simon, a relaunch of “The Sandman” before he went to the Vertigo imprint.

The world may never know what would have happened if DC editors had allowed Kirby’s Superman to shine through, instead of having Neal Adams and Curt Swan re-draw him in EVERY PANEL to fit their house style.

RIP Jack, and Happy Birthday! Some guys get all the luck.

Finally reading Final Crisis: Superman Beyond 3-D.

Finally reading Final Crisis: Superman Beyond 3-D.

totallygaytotallycool:

Now THIS would have reduced the movie to about a 5-minute short.

totallygaytotallycool:

Now THIS would have reduced the movie to about a 5-minute short.

exhibit a
ginandbluegatorade:

So
I don’t know what my brother is doing. I thought we were a DC family but I suppose those Spider Man comics did something to him. 

exhibit a

ginandbluegatorade:

So

I don’t know what my brother is doing. I thought we were a DC family but I suppose those Spider Man comics did something to him. 

while the superman will probably forever remain cast as the prototypical ubermensch, a wish fulfillment fantasy for the downtrodden, the spider-man is compelling because he is the opposite - a down-on-his-luck everyman who just can’t catch a break.  beyond that, actually, the common theme of every spider-man could actually be that the impulse to do good contributes to that old “parker luck.”

obviously, this isn’t peter parker. in the half-black/half-hispanic miles morales, one can see marvel comics’  reaction to the demographic reality, a little late, that the “everyman” may no longer be a white guy.  the superman, similarly recently reconfigured as part of dc comics’ “new 52”, still comes from kansas.

while the superman will probably forever remain cast as the prototypical ubermensch, a wish fulfillment fantasy for the downtrodden, the spider-man is compelling because he is the opposite - a down-on-his-luck everyman who just can’t catch a break.  beyond that, actually, the common theme of every spider-man could actually be that the impulse to do good contributes to that old “parker luck.”

obviously, this isn’t peter parker. in the half-black/half-hispanic miles morales, one can see marvel comics’  reaction to the demographic reality, a little late, that the “everyman” may no longer be a white guy.  the superman, similarly recently reconfigured as part of dc comics’ “new 52”, still comes from kansas.